▲ Up
 
10:55 23-07-2017
АКИpress CA-News Tazabek Turmush
ADVERTISE WITH US SUBSCRIBE
KazakhstanKyrgyzstanMongoliaTajikistanTurkmenistanUzbekistanWorld
POLITICSBUSINESSINCIDENTSSOCIETYCULTURESPORTANALYSISSCIENCE
Diet sodas may be tied to stroke, dementia risk
13:16, 21 April 2017, 1694
Twitterfacebookprint

AKIPRESS.COM - When it comes to the dangers of regularly drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages, the science is clear. It rots your teeth, makes you fat, and puts you at a higher risk of diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The list goes on and on—just ask your doctor.

When it comes to diet soda, the science has been less solid. It will lower your overall sugar consumption to switch from Coke to Diet Coke, but it might cause other problems. Artificial sweeteners have been associated with—but not shown to necessarily cause—weight gain, diabetes, and heart disease

On Thursday, two studies by the same group of researchers gave soda drinkers—both diet and regular—a whole new reason to drop the habit entirely, Bloomberg reported.

The first, published in the medical journal Stroke, found that consumption of artificially sweetened beverages was associated with a higher risk of stroke and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. The second, published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, found that higher consumption of sugary beverages was associated with markers for pre-clinical Alzheimer’s disease. 

Led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, the authors of the Stroke study conducted a review of data collected through the Framingham Heart Study, a multi-decade observational review that began with more than 5,000 volunteer participants in 1948 and has included their offspring since 1971 and their grandchildren since 2002. The FHS entailed nine examination cycles held approximately every four years; participants logged beverage intake through questionnaires that surveyed their diets over the previous 12 months. In these studies, the researchers looked at the seventh cycle for the offspring, from 1998 to 2001, and the second cycle for the grandchildren, from 2008 to 2011. 

In the study cited in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, the researchers found that higher consumption of sugary beverages was associated with a pattern consistent with preclinical Alzheimer’s, including smaller total brain volume and poorer episodic memory. The authors called the findings “striking” because they were found in a middle-aged sample and withstood statistical adjustment for such factors as physical activity and total caloric intake. The results align with earlier research done with smaller samples, including one with 737 middle-aged participants in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, which found that higher sugar intake was cross-sectionally associated with Alzheimer’s-like behavioral patterns.

The Alzheimer’s & Dementia study notes its limitations, including that it doesn’t establish causality, the homogenous population sample didn’t include minorities, and questionnaire-based consumption data are inherently unreliable. 

Responded William Dermody Jr., vice president of policy at the American Beverage Association, the chief lobby for soda makers: “The Alzheimer’s Association points out that the greatest risk factors for Alzheimer’s are increasing age, family history of Alzheimer’s, and genetics—not sugar intake, from any source.”

The Stroke study, meanwhile, found an association with artificially sweetened beverages and stroke and dementia, while not finding a similar association for consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, an observation the authors characterized as “intriguing.” An editorial accompanying the study noted this finding—and that it contradicted other studies that found the opposite. This study, the authors noted, has the same limitations as the Alzheimer’s & Dementia analysis, as well as another important one: The association could be a case of reverse causality, “whereby sicker individuals consume diet beverages as a means of negating a further deterioration of health.”

That concern is based on the way diabetes status partially mediated the association between artificially sweetened beverage consumption and dementia. In other words, having diabetes may be more of a risk factor for dementia than consuming artificially sweetened beverages is. The relationships among beverage consumption, diabetes, and dementia remain unclear.


Log-in / Sign-up

your choice: 1 month (2000 som)

Twitterfacebookprint
LATEST NEWS
18:08 'Turkey hasn't open its doors to those who shot at their own people after 2010 events in Kyrgyzstan' – adviser to president of Turkey17:02 Przhevalsky Museum to be rehabilitated in Karakol16:50 PM Jeenbekov orders to finish construction of schools by new academic year16:05 662 mln som allocated for rehabilitation of Balykchy — Korumdu road out of planned 912 mln — Ministry of Transport15:29 Atambayev, ex–chairman of El Kurultai of Altai Republic discuss cooperation15:12 Palestinian President to freeze contact with Israel ‘on all levels’14:03 813.2 million som allocated for motorway repairs in H113:15 Kyrgyz Embassy asks migrants in Russia to deliver biometric data12:12 Tender for construction of burnt building of General Prosecutor's Office of Kyrgyzstan announced again11:36 Three Israelis stabbed to death in West Bank attack11:05 Cargo transportation between Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan 14% up10:14 Tourists from Chelyabinsk use 6-10 day tours to Issyk-Kul - Delegation of Chelyabinsk09:36 Tajikistan to promote clothing to counter ‘alien’ traditions09:17 India musician plays guitar during brain surgery09:05 Mortality rate among children under 5 years old down two-thirds: First Lady17:55 PM Jeenbekov orders to accelerate rehabilitation of resort for teachers17:21 Minister of Transport of Kyrgyzstan calls on employees to work on weekends16:30 'Dunkirk': How historically accurate is Christopher Nolan's WWII battle film?16:30 Probe launched against 19yo boy who went to Issyk-Kul with 14yo girl16:10 Atambayev congratulates newly elected president of India
© AKIpress News Agency - 2001-2017. All rights reserved
Republication of any material is prohibited without a written agreement with AKIpress News Agency. Any citation must be accompanied by a hyperlink to akipress.com.
Our address:
Moskovskaya str. 189, Bishkek, the Kyrgyz Republic
e-mail: english@akipress.org, akipressenglish@gmail.com;
Tel/Fax: +996(312)90-07-75